Saturday, 21 July 2012

Cigarette Packet Dog

I am looking for any information on how to make a dog out of cigarette packets.

The purpose of this website is to gather as much information as possible about constructing Cigarette Packet Dogs, share the knowledge with others and hopefully prevent this craft from dying out.

I remember as a young boy in the 1950s being shown a dog made out of Woodbine cigarette packets, similar to the one pictured below. Unfortunately, I was never shown how it was made and have wondered ever since how it was done.

This seems to be another one of those crafts that is dying out. Possible reasons for this was the introduction of the flip-top cigarette packet (less material was available to use) and the legislation forcing manufaturers to add Health Warnings. The text type health warnings introduced in 1971 wasn't too bad but the  graphic type health warnings cover most of the packet and aren't very nice to look at.

In this day and age where most people are aware of the benefits of recycling, what better way of reusing your empty cigarette packets.







Measurements

Length: 14½" (36cm)
Height: 11½" (28cm)
Width:      6" (15cm)






This particular model is made from a mixture of Lambert & Butler, Raffles and Richmond Superkings 20s cigarette packets.

If you can offer any information, photos, drawings or anything else on how to construct this type of cigarette packet model, it would be very much appreciated.  Anything suitable will be added to this website for others to share in.





Basic Construction Details

After studying one of the dogs that I have, I can see that a sequence of squares made up from 4 strips is used for construction. Each strip cut horizontaly across the cigarette packet makes a flattened loop. By connecting a series of 4 strips together they form a square with 4 legs. These legs are then used to make another connecting square and so on. As yet I still have to work out where to start the model and how to make shapes.

I hope the above pictures help you get started. As I obtain  more construction details or any other information, I will add it to this site.

I would also like to add a Picture Gallery page of any  models you have. If you have any pictures please send them to kamiorijo@gmail.com and I will include them on it. If you could give me any information about pictures you send, that would be even better. Any pictures sent will be credited to yourself.

Any comments you have would be most welcome.



 Photographs and all other content on this site are the copyright of © John Hewitson 2011 
 Please obtain my permission if you want to use anything from my site.
 Always credit me with anything used and link back to this site.

© copyright J.Hewitson 2012

4 comments:

Suporna Sarkar said...

Nice Blog !
I Like This Very Much.
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Anonymous said...

is this for real?

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the useful guide. I remember a friend of mine having one of these, in the 1950s, that her Uncle had made for her, and I yearned for one ever since.
Remembering this, all these years later, made me search out for information on how these were made, and it's lovely to find out a bit more.

Anonymous said...

I have had the same yearning as you to keep this art alive,although at this stage I don't have the answer. Thanks for the blog sight.